Jose Davila

Tuba player and trombonist Jose Davila is a versatile New York-based musician whose work spans across a broad spectrum of musical genres; everything from traditional to cutting-edge jazz, to salsa and classical music. He is currently a member of Henry Threadgill’s Zooid and bands led by guitarist Liberty Ellman and alto saxophonist Steve Lehman. His work with both Threadgill and Ellman extends the tuba from its traditional role as part of the rhythm section to a front-line solo voice. His playing can also be heard on the Grammy-nominated salsa recording “Un Gran Dia en el Barrio” from the Spanish Harlem Orchestra and “Remembranzas” and “Siguendo la Tradicion” from Soneros del Barrio.

Davila has also worked in the bands of Ray Charles, Andrew Hill, Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Marc Anthony, Eddie Palmieri, Ray Anderson, Butch Morris, Ted Nash, along with the Lincoln Center Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra and the American Symphony and New York City Opera Orchestras.

A native of Puerto Rico who was raised on the East Coast, Jose received his formal musical training from the University of Connecticut and Mannes College of Music.

 
Related News

Our latest release: Mise en Abime from the Steve Lehman Octet was not only the lead review in the August Downbeat, it received a rare 5 star rating! In his review, John Corbett writes: “I’m rarely moved to say something like this, but Steve Lehman’s work is required listening for the next generation.”

Read the full review HERE.

posted on June 30, 2014 by Intern

 

Some recent interesting Henry Threadgill stuff on the Internet: A nice interview with Jason Crane on The Jazz Session and a great VIDEO of Zooid performing at Roulette.

Also, Elliot Humberto Kavee, Zooid’s drummer and also erstwhile member of both the Rudresh Mahanthappa Quartet and Fieldwork, gets a great feature in Modern Drummer magazine. Check the stuff out!

posted on May 9, 2010 by Yulun

 

Special thanks to Jazz Times and the New York Times for their support:

New York Times Year End Best of List
Nat Chinen
Steve Lehman - Travail, Transformation & Flow #1
Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To Vol.1, #3
Ben Ratliff
Steve Lehman - Travail, Transformation & Flow #5

Jazz Times Top 50 Releases of 2009
Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To Vol.1, # 4
Steve Lehman - Travail, Transformation & Flow #11

PopMatters.com Best of Jazz 2009
Steve Lehman - Travail, Transformation & Flow #6
Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To Vol.1, #7

posted on December 21, 2009 by Intern

 

Year end polls are starting to come in. We would like to thank the following critics for their support:

Bill Milkowski
Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To, Vol. 1, # 1

Steve Feeney
Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To Vol.1, # 3

Jason Crane
Steve Lehman - Travail, Transformation & Flow, # 9

Michael J. West
Steve Lehman - Travail, Transformation & Flow, # 7

Howard Mandel
Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To, Vol. 1, # 1
Steve Lehman Octet - Travail, Transformation, and Flow, # 5

Hank Shteamer
Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To, Volume 1, # 6

David R. Adler
Steve Lehman Octet - Travail Transformation & Flow, # 5

Christian Broecking Henry Threadgill Zooid - This Brings Us To, Vol. 1, # 2
Steve Lehman Octet - Travail, Transformation, and Flow, # 3

We would also like the thank Nate Chinen for choosing Travail, Transformation, and Flow, and This Brings Us To, Vol. 1 as his number one and two picks. Click here to check out the ongoing conversation.

Finally, a special thanks to Seth Colter Walls for citing Travail, Transformation, and Flow in his Newsweek article, Jazz Is Dead. Long Live Jazz.

posted on December 14, 2009 by Intern

 

The praise is streaming in for Henry Threadgill Zooid’s This Brings Us To, Volume 1. It’s awfully gratifying to see so much renewed attention being paid to “one of the most important living composers in and around the jazz idiom,” as Nate Chinen said of Threadgill in The New York Times. If you’ve been like us, waiting with bated breath for a new release from Henry, your time has come. Along with the release, there has been a flood of great feature articles and interviews that reveal much about the person behind so much of the finest, most original music of the last 40 years. We can all take inspiration from a man who has consistently refused to rest on his laurels, who’s not afraid to break down what he already knows, to keep studying and learning, and to create music that is truly new and challenging. If you are a fan of Threadgill’s, or if you are just interested in the thoughts of a great musical genius, you owe it to yourself to read or listen to each of these:

Fine feature article by Nate Chinen in The New York Times:
Master of the Mutable, in an Idiom All His Own

If that’s not enough, here is a more thorough analysis by Chinen in his excellent blog of Threadgill’s musical system for Zooid with help from Henry and the band’s guitarist Liberty Ellman: Regarding Henry

You need to pick up the November issue of The Wire for a great article by Hank Shteamer on Henry. But if that only served to whet your appetite, you owe it to yourself to read this full and unedited transcript of the interview.

A leisurely chat with Henry by Josh Jackson for WBGO’s The Checkout.

Howard Mandel’s honest and heartfelt reflection on how he approaches Henry’s new music: Henry Threadgill refuses to supply sweet, simple tunes

Enjoy!

posted on November 10, 2009 by Yulun

 

Steve Lehman’s Travail, Transformation, and Flow was featured in an enthusiastic review on NPR’s Fresh Air today. Critic Kevin Whitehead said “In Jazz like any art form, there are historical moments when it seems like all the angles have been covered and there’s nothing left to explore. And then someone comes with a new idea or a new influence that points out a fresh direction.” Thanks, Steve for paving a new way for the music!

Now back to our Henry Threadgill sale. Make sure you pick up a copy of Travail while you’re at it! (See below for details)

posted on September 23, 2009 by Yulun

 
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